First Shot:


In the fall of 2009, the first prototype was test fired; this is the actual target.



 
  “Our bullet makes one memorable first impression”

 
   
 



The small hole (Shot 1) just below and to the right of center is a target strike of a .45 caliber slug and is used to put things in perspective. In contrast, the +-10” diameter tri-tipped hole is a .45 caliber MI4 expanding round fired from the same distance, from the same gun just moments later.


NOTE:
The shooter was aiming at the center line on both shots and experienced small alignment errors on both shots. However, the MI4 shot compensated for the error and then some!

In a gun battle, which of these two lethal rounds would you rather shoot at a bad guy to gain a “first hit advantage”?



 


How it Works:
Brief Summary

The specific configuration of the interlocking MI4 bullet segments and the proprietary radial expansion tether/brake system housed in the nose of the assembly, travel down a rifled barrel as one unit, rotating just like a standard slug. Then, as the bullet leaves the tip of the gun, the Instant Expansion Technology activates, harnessing the spin generated forces, to simultaneously:



(i) unlock and move the segments of a multi-projectile shot outward from the center of rotation achieving a specific orthogonal orientation compared to its flight path (at a right angle) in an exacting manner.

(ii) activate the multi-staged incremental radial expansion braking and tether restraint system (tether/brake system) that interconnects the segments like a spiders web.

(iii) fully deploy the tether/brake system, locking the segments into orbit with the help of the ever present centrifugal force.

(iv) gyroscopically stabilize the expanded bullet assembly during flight, assuring a natural flight path and trajectory for the remainder of its journey down range regardless of distance.


 
   
 


In simple terms, the spinning segments are forced outward from the center of rotation until they are slowed to a stop by the tether/brake system. The segments are then held in orbit by the tethers and the ever present centrifugal force as they rotate down range towards the target. This wide fixed spread pattern compensates for most if not all of the typical misalignment of the barrel caused by Last Second Twitch.  The final result is a much greater chance of striking the intended target.


 
 


How it Works:
Detailed Summary

The primary function of the interlocking MI4 segments is to assure a simultaneous departure from the gun barrel. As the projectile assembly is fired and travels down bore of the rifled firearm, the projectile assembly begins to spin. Also, due to the confinement within the barrel, the portions of the projectile assembly maintain their interlocked relationship regardless of spin generated forces. However, once the projectile assembly exits the barrel of the firearm, the spinning forces imparted on the projectile assembly by the rifling causes the previously interlocked portions of the projectile to simultaneously move rapidly outward (Accelerated Radial Spread) away from their original center of rotation.


Due to the synchronized movement assured by the uniformity of spacing of the interlocked projectile segments and the simultaneous departure from the barrel, the portions preserve the uniform spacing (120° on center) from one another while the projectile assembly spreads out as it continues to travel spin stabilized along its original trajectory path away from the barrel. As the projectile assembly travels further down range, the spin generated forces move the pre-fragmented pieces increasingly away from their shared center of rotation, a multi-staged tether/brake system (originally housed within a protective cavity formed in the tip of the assembly of interlocking segments) begins to emerge, at first intentionally offering little resistance to slow down the rapid outward rate of expansion.


This intentional delay in the application of a radial movement breaking force is to allow for the most rapid possible separation (Accelerated Radial Spread) of the individual segments from the original center of rotation to increase the area of influence (hit probability) in ultra-close engagements (C.Q.B).


After the initial delay, the tether/brake system enters a second phase, and begins to arrest the outward movement of the segments by applying small incremental amounts of resistance (note: restricted information/not depicted in public disclosures) that collectivity counter the vast majority if not all of the pulling force exerted on the tether/brake system. If additional radial movement persists beyond deployment of the second phase, an additional phase of the braking system activates (note: restricted information/not depicted in public disclosures).


This third phase arrests the balance of the pulling force and along with the ever present centrifugal force inherent in the spinning assembly, the segments lock into orbit around their original center of rotation and the expanded projectile assembly remains gyroscopically stabilized as if it had remained a solid slug.


The now separated segments lock into a spin-stabilized orbit at a fixed distance from center and each other respectively (360° ÷ 3 = 120° separation), continue down range in a predetermined spread pattern until some or all of the projectile assembly strikes an object or falls to the ground.


 
Accelerated Radial Spread / Instant Expansion Technology:

By harnessing the spin generated forces from a rifled barrel, a T3 bullet can achieve a rapid radial expansion producing an optimal spread pattern up to four times faster (4x) than buckshot, resulting in a significant tactical advantage - particularly at close engagements.

Example: A T3 round can achieve a 12 inch spread as quickly as 8 feet from the tip of the gun.
Accelerated Radial Spread / Instant Expansion Technology

By harnessing the spin generated forces from a rifled barrel, a T3 bullet can achieve a rapid radial expansion producing an optimal spread pattern up to four times faster (4x) than buckshot, resulting in a significant tactical advantage - particularly at close engagements.


Example: A T3 round can achieve a 12 inch spread as quickly as 8 feet from the tip of the gun.
Last Second Twitch or LST

Simply put, Last Second Twitch describes how the shooter’s final aim point when the bullet leaves the barrel of the gun is different from when he/she started pulling the trigger. As most shooters know, a bullet’s trajectory (and ultimate strike point) is primarily determined by the gun’s alignment at the time of firing. What most people do not realize is that high pressure situations magnify the body’s psychological (fear/anticipation) and physiological (shake/paralysis) reactions that naturally occur each time the trigger is pulled when firing a gun. The combined reactions more often than not result in marksmen's error, causing them to miss their intended targets.

Orthogonal orientation

Two vectors are orthogonal if they are perpendicular, i.e., they form a right angle. As it relates to ballistics, the spread pattern of our new bullets is confined substantially to a single plane of expansion at a right angle to the bullets trajectory path. Simply put as a result of the spin generated forces from the rifle barrel, the three segments of a T3 projectile are first forced to move out from the center of rotation and then are gyroscopically held in orbit at a right angle and predetermined distance from the original center of rotation (flight path). This one feature not only assures a simultaneous impact of the segments on the target, it also preserves the precision and accuracy of a spin stabilized bullet.

Tether/brake

Our proprietary dual functioning tether and brake component that first allows for a rapid radial expansion of the segments, then gradually arrests the outward movement activating only as much of the pressure sensitive braking system necessary to suspend the segments into orbit at a fixed distance around the original center of rotation.